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other lists

Foresters who were killed during WW2_855 names: The list includes the Family Name, First Name, Date of Death, and Details concerning the death.  The list was compiled by Edward ORŁOWSKI from a number of sources .  (Note: Polish diacritic letters are used in this document)

Property Owners in the Kresy in 1939 _ 970 names: The list includes the City/Town/Village Name, the Province, the District, the Municipality, and the name(s) of the Owner(s).  The list was sourced from the website:"Majątków województw lwowskiego, stanisławowskiego i tarnopolskiego".  (Note: Polish diacritic letters are used in this document)

South American volunteers for the Polish Army in France - 370 names: The list includes (where available) the Family Name, First Name,, Date of Birth, Place of Birth, Last Residence, Military Rank/Occupation, whether the person was Killed in Action/Missing in Action, the Date of Departure, the Departure Port, the Ship sailed on. The list was compiled by the Polish Consular offices in South America.   (Note: Polish diacritic letters are used in this document)

Orphans of Zudilow Orphanage returning to Poland in 1946 - 80 names: The list includes the Family Name, First Name, Father's Name, Year of Birth, and Place of Birth.  The information was put together by the the orphanage authorities.   (Note: Polish diacritic letters are not used in this document)

  • Students at the Navy School in Landywood - 268 names: This is a list of Navy Cadets who attended the Navy School at Landywood in Stafordshire, UK.  The list includes the Family Name, First Name, and the Class #. .   (Note: Polish diacritic letters are not used in this document)

  • Polish Soldiers who went to Australia on SS Asturias - 596 names :    This list is sourced from the SS Asturias passenger list in the Australian online archives.  The list includes the Family Name, First Name, Age, Occupation, and Arrival Date.   (Note: Polish diacritic letters are not used in this document)

  • List of names from a book by the Polish Canadian Combatants, Branch #2 in London, Ontario  - 620 names :    The book title is  "BOOK OF REMEMBRANCE: Traces will Remain of the Days Gone By " and it provides bios of the members of Branch #2, many of whom were deported to Siberia and subsequently joined the Polish Forces in the west, eventually settling in the London, Ontario region.  Some of the bios are very short, while others are quite detailed.  Our thanks to Branch #2 for providing a digital version of the book that you can view on the DOCUMENTS page of this website.   (Note: Polish diacritic letters are not used in this document)

  • List of names from a book by Aleksander Topolski called "Without Vodka" - 202 names.   The list was kindly  provided by his widow, Joan Eddis Topolski.  The list forms the basis of the book's index and briefly descrobes each person.     (Note: Polish diacritic letters are not used in this document)

  • People deported with Henryk Piotroweski_85 names. Henryk Piotrowski of Toronto provided this list of the people who were deported to the Jagwila Camp in the USSR.  He recalled the Family names, but not always the first names.

  • Veterans and Siberian Survivors in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada - 348 names:   This is a partial list of WW2 veterans who served in the Polish Forces in the West and/or were deported to Siberia by the Russians. The list was compiled by Krystyna Szypowska.

  • Polish Refugees registered with the Polish Consulate in Shanghai (1932-1941) - 1531 names:   The document called Shanghai Ledger contains the records on Polish citizens kept by the Consulate of Poland in Shanghai in 1934-1943. As in other outposts of this kind, the ledger was kept pursuant to laws in force in 1924. The ledger was the supporting administrative tool for the diplomatic outpost as well as for the citizens, who settled in a given consulate jurisdiction. Based on the ledger, Polish citizens were able to apply for various documents and compensation. They could also be found more easily by their relatives and were able to get through all the formalities at the consulate faster. The ledger records the experiences of the citizens listed and the material evidence of the care and help provided by the Polish diplomatic and consular outposts in the Far East (Tokyo and Shanghai) after the outbreak of WWII. The original copy of the Polish Citizens Register kept by the Consulate in Shanghai was handed over to the archives of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs in April 1996, where it is stored to this day (Archives of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Reference No. 43/2003). In addition to personal names, the register provides the following categories of information: date of registration; profession; religion; place and date of birth; marital status; permanent address in Poland and address of next of kin [rarely provided]; place of residence in the consular district; documents on the basis of which the person is registered [generally, passport]; names and year and place of birth of wife and children; passport expiration date; comments [e.g., "emigrated to America," "returned to Poland," "died"]. Roughly 60% of the registrants are identified as Jewish, 34% as Roman Catholic, 3% as Orthodox, and 2% as Protestant.

Polish soldiers who travelled from Archangelsk to Glasgow - 200 names: The list includes the Family Name, Initial, and Military Rank of the Siberian deportees who travelled from Archangel to Glasgow in October 1941.  The list was sourced from a descendant of one of the soldiers on the list..   (Note: Polish diacritic letters are not used in this document)

AK members (Home Army) who trained in England July 1942 to September 1944 - 87 names: The list includes the Rank, Family Name, First Name, and Pseudonym of each Home Army trainee.  The list was sourced from a descendant of one of the soldiers on the list.   (Note: Polish diacritic letters are used in this document)

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